Daily Archives: January 26, 2009

Cyber Policy – Safety and the Internet – An update

Parry Aftab, blogging on the McAfee Security Insights Blog, gives a quick history on the Internet Safety Task Force that was, well, taken to task because of its corporate funding partners (See Jan 25 post).  She says further research is in the future:

The ISTTF is the first task force of its kind in the United States. And, although it may not have provided major new findings, it did get things jump-started. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) working group will be announced very shortly and hopefully one under the guidance of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will be compiled. The Attorneys General are seeking more concrete recommendations and an action plan. And the members of the ISTTF are looking for the opportunity to provide those concrete recommendations.

A journey, not a destination…we need to remember that.

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Filed under cybersecurity, public values

Cybersecurity – Patriotism doesn’t always defend

Securityfix presents interesting analysis concerning conficker — seems the creators don’t mind soiling their native lands.

According to an analysis by Microsoft engineers, the original version of the Downadup (a.k.a. “Conficker”) worm will quit the installation process if the malware detects the host system is configured with a Ukrainian keyboard layout. However, the latest variant has no such restriction. Stats collected by Finnish computer security firm F-Secure show that Russia and Ukraine had the second and fifth-largest number of victims from the worm, 139,934 and 63,939, respectively, as of Tuesday, Jan. 20.

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Stem Cell’s – Business Proposition to be proven

California’s $3 billion effort has just begun (2007) — and this article from the San Jose Mercury News points out that profits are long term, not short term, because:

  1. Ethical/moral arguments surrounding stem cell research
  2. So little is known, basic research is the first recipient of funds
  3. Risky process of developing product keeps investors at bay
  4. Two companies, Geron and Advanced Cell, hold many of the patents for human embryonic stem cell research and associated technologies.

However, there are eternal optimists:

“You’ll see more companies forming around embryonic work,” said Gregory Bonfiglio, managing partner of Palo Alto-based Proteus Venture Partners, which plans to invest in such firms. “This technology will fundamentally change health care.”

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