Monthly Archives: January 2013

Why we use textbooks

From David Warlick’s blog on teaching and learning — a thought-provoking essay (wait, I am redundant), an essay discussing the utilities of a textbook.  Lots of ideas that may provoke many more essays, hopefully to learn why we use texts, how texts may transform, what we should do about texts whose cost exceed both present and future value….  But, nonetheless, lots of ideas…  like:

The job of the teacher would be to locate (or cause to be located) and attach content (both open-source and/or commercial), in any appropriate format, to that arrangement of scope and sequence-forming tags and constantly filter and refine that content based on changing conditions and newly available content?

What might this process look like as an integral part of teacher education?  Might the act of starting their own flexible digital textbooks be a part of learning to teach.  (Is “Flexbook” trademarked?  How about “flexibook?”)

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My daughter has entered the blogosphere and Why we write

Seems like yesterday, I lifted Caiti up to place the star on the family Christmas tree.  Now she enters the blogosphere, and writes about her fear of heights and why she writes.

Dave Winer discusses the power of writing as it is an exercise in thinking.  Dave Winer is one of the creators of the blogosphere.  I started blogging 12 years ago using one of his first blog products, Radio UserLand.

Which reminds me of other good readings about why we (should) write:

Writing is purpose-driven thinking.  Writing is hard work.  Writing can be exegesis for the curious and an occlusion of reality for the escapist.

Here’s to good thoughts, good writing, and a mastery of the outputs of her amygdala!

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MOOCs Rising?

Three articles — focused on San Jose’s project to use MOOCs….

California State U. Will Experiment With Offering Credit for MOOCs

Courses in the pilot project are aimed at high-school students and students enrolled at community colleges in the state.

Faculty members will retain the intellectual-property rights to the course materials, said Ms. Junn.

Udacity’s Credit Path

The American Council on Education (ACE) said it would evaluate four Udacity courses, all of which are entry-level, for credit recommendations. And San Jose State University announced a deal to jointly offer three $150 courses with Udacity, in a trial run enrolling 300 students.

Davidson is gracious enough not to say so, but the dirty little secret we all know is that the massive lecture was only ever an economic expedient; it was never a particularly effective way to teach.  Replacing one economic expedient with another, more effective one hardly constitutes an outrage.  

Turning In To the Skid

Davidson is gracious enough not to say so, but the dirty little secret we all know is that the massive lecture was only ever an economic expedient; it was never a particularly effective way to teach.  Replacing one economic expedient with another, more effective one hardly constitutes an outrage.

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MOOC lessons learned

Good read

Teaching a MOOC: Lessons Learned & Best Balch Practices

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